17 April 2009

Impossible!

12 comments:

Femina said...

Yeah, there's a good reason you never see chokoes for sale... just in buckets and baskets on the side of the road with pathetic little notes on them. "Free chokoes. Really. Free! Take as many as you like. Take some for your friends too..."

Givinya De Elba said...

Yeah. Perhaps if they GAVE you a dollar for taking them off your hands, they'd go.

A friend of mine thought of ways to take chokoes and actually enjoy them:
1. Putting them in people's exhaust pipes
2. Throwing them at people
3. Etc...

(Thanks A.T.)

Hippomanic Jen said...

I'm with everyone else, but they'd need to pay me more than a dollar to take them. My MUM on the other hand actually buys them at the supermarket. Then used to make me eat them. blerrch.

GreenJello said...

Huh. Learn something new every day. I've never seen one of these green guys before. I'd actually like to try one.

The trick would be to actually find one in Utah, United States. :)

Stranded in Stepford said...

Chokoes- please expand. . . I have no frame of reference!

I'm getting from Jen's comment that they're food but what do they taste like? Cause I've only rarely met a food I won't devour :)

Hairline Fracture said...

I'm guessing they aren't very tasty.

Jen said...

Um, I don't get it.

Hippomanic Jen said...

For the Americans among us - Chokoes are a vegetable. They grown to about the size of a capsicum (pepper?).

They are light green inside, with a seedy part in the middle. Can be peeled, seed cut out and steamed with other vegies which results in a soft texture (similar to zucchini flesh where there is no seed) but NO TASTE WHATSOEVER!

My dictionary says that it describes the perennial vine Sechium edule of tropical America and in the US is called chocho or chayote (from the Brazilian Indian name chuchu).

In Queensland they were traditionally grown over the chook-yard fence (chicken pen?) and due to their tasteless quality have been used during hard years like the depression to stretch out a small amount of apple in apple pie, or in jams or chutneys as a filler. Or as a vegetable when vegetables were too hard (or expensive) to buy.

Unless you are my Mum, in which case you choose to buy them from the shops and inflict them on your kids during times when other vegetables were affordable.

Femina said...

Yes, they have no taste. I imagine if there were a way to make water solid (without freezing it) you'd be coming close to the taste of a choko.

My mum served them to us too. Bought from the supermarket. On purpose. By choice. When there were other things available. She even served them up when we were having a roast lamb dinner. For years I thought chokoes tasted like gravy.

Oh, and if you don't peel them properly they still have no taste but the edges are slimy and sticky.

Swift Jan said...

OH my lovely friend... every Sunday Swift Jim & I giggle at that basket!!! So glad you blogged it!! :D

Givinya De Elba said...

Holy Kamoley - is that basket STILL THERE?!?!?

Now THAT should tell us all something!

Crazy Sister said...

I just remember Mum swearing at the choko vine we inherited with the house that it was practically a weed and one day she'd kill it.

She did - good for her! But they were good missiles.